Hypercorrect

It doesn't mean "extremely correct."

Apr 16
rimbaudwasademonchild:

The Cramps photographed by Youri Lenquette, 1987.
via

rimbaudwasademonchild:

The Cramps photographed by Youri Lenquette, 1987.

via

(via zgmfd)


thisishangingrockcomics:

my mom roundin up the posers apparently

thisishangingrockcomics:

my mom roundin up the posers apparently

(via deductivereasonable)


rabbitfishtv:

boomerstarkiller67:

Moonbase Commander, Lieutenant Gay Ellis

UFO was an amazing show. It was preposterous and under-scripted, but had an cold apocalyptic vibe and style, style, style.


howardcruse:

Would I have drawn this in the early-’70s if I hadn’t dropped a lot of acid in the late-’60s? Not likely.

howardcruse:

Would I have drawn this in the early-’70s if I hadn’t dropped a lot of acid in the late-’60s? Not likely.


Always post the rules
Answer the questions from the person who tagged you
Write 7 new ones
Tag 7 people
Actually tell them you tagged them

1) Do you see the world with what eyes? With banality, the way as it is, or with some magic on it, looking wonder beyond the veil?

I see the world like a squeamish scientist. OH GOD WE’RE ALL MADE OUT OF MEAT AND WHEN WE TALK WE’RE MAKING NOISE BY SQUIRTING AIR OUT OF OUR MEAT.

2) How many languages you know (spoken and written)?

I’m only really fluent in English. I grew up in a town with a large population of balanced Spanish/English bilingual people so I don’t not know Spanish but all the grammar isn’t really there for me.

I studied Japanese in college but my abilities have slowly declined, especially as far as writing and speaking go. I get semi-regular reading and listening practice through different kinds of media so those skills aren’t great but they’re in slightly better condition.

3) Any possession that is your totem/dearest/memento/horcrux?

Lately it’s been the old publications I’ve been collecting for Gay News Ephemera.

Especially with the stuff from the 50s, I’m amazed this stuff made it to 2014 in such good shape and it would be a shame if it ended its journey with me. I’m already thinking of where I’d like these items to go eventually. I want to find a place that would both give a fuck about them and put them in reach of nonacademic researchers/history buffs/hobbyists like me. That means low or no fees for scans and shit like that.

4) Favourite God of any mythology and WHY!

I was raised an atheist so I don’t really have much personal attachment to any particular god. Flamboyantly gay Marian worship owns though

5) Your favourite Flower, and Why!

I miss the mandevilla vines that took over the front of the house for a few years in my teens. Yellow trumpet flowers, big glossy green leaves. They partially covered my window and filtered the harsh South Texas sun down to a nice pale green.

I also like anything that attracts hummingbirds.

6) Where do you want to travel if you had the chance to?

I’d really like to go back to Manchester. That was a really cool city, even if I didn’t vibe so much with the gay men? Like the bouncers at a lot of places didn’t read me as gay, (“You know this is a gay bar, right?”) when I was completely unambiguous in Portland. London was cute too but northern English accents, man.

If Scotland goes for independence later this year, it would be cool to go see the start of that. I’d also really like to visit Barcelona. Catalan is kind of a trip to listen to as someone who grew up with the sound of Mexican Spanish. Lisbon would be cute too, especially since I saw a thing saying that hotel prices there are way cheaper than average for western Europe.

Going to Japan would be great as well. Tokyo would obv be the main destination, but Kyoto and Osaka would be nice too.

7) What’s your favourite food?

I really like most variations on curry, but it’s not so readily available in Laredo so I gorged myself when I visited England in 2011. After hours street vendors had like curry fries and stuff, which is great, but it tended to be really mild/bland compared to the stuff at dedicated sit-down restaurants.
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I don’t really wanna tag anybody so the line ends with me!


dfa1985:

Tom Browne - Funkin’ for Jamaica

- Alex

(via discofunksoulandthensome)


Maybe it’s just that I’m no longer watching TV rips, but season 3 of Dynasty seems to be shot with nicer film and lighting.


Apr 15
Hot for S/S 2014: Semantic satiation.

Hot for S/S 2014: Semantic satiation.

(via mrrobotico)


gaynewsephemera:

Relevant Readz: Letters to ONE, edited by Craig M. Loftin.

This guy got into the ONE Archives at USC and transcribed a bunch of (mostly) never-published letters to ONE Magazine, making it almost the exact kind of social-history-by-document-dump that this tumblr tries to practice.

The intro has a really good bit on the changing historical usage of the phrase “coming out”:

The letters also challenge the common perception that gay men and lesbians spent the 1950s “in the closet.” The word “closet” neither appears in any letters in this book, nor in any ONE correspondence in its current usage. The modern closet metaphor did not exist in the 1950s and early 1960s because there was no expectation that gay people would reveal their homosexuality to anyone except other gay people. “Coming out” to heterosexuals was a political strategy introduced by gay activists in the late 1960s and early 1970s. “The closet” emerged as the binary opposite of this new definition of “coming out”; hence the phrase “coming out of the closet" replaced the older phrase "coming out to gay life." It is misleading when the closet metaphor is applied to the 1950s and 1960s because the term has so many negative connotations. "The closet" is a condescending term associated with being ashamed, frightened, or unhappy about being gay. Most of ONE’s correspondents were none of these things. They did not imagine themselves dwelling in some vast closet, but imagined themselves wearing masks that enabled them to pass as heterosexual when necessary in order to avoid antigay persecution. A "mask" is a very different metaphor than a "closet." Closets are dark places where people hide. Masks imply subterfuge, resistance, defiance, and perhaps most importantly, human agency.

The same author has a companion book to this one called Masked Voices, and those last few lines illuminate the reasoning behind that choice of title.

gaynewsephemera:

Relevant Readz: Letters to ONE, edited by Craig M. Loftin.

This guy got into the ONE Archives at USC and transcribed a bunch of (mostly) never-published letters to ONE Magazine, making it almost the exact kind of social-history-by-document-dump that this tumblr tries to practice.

The intro has a really good bit on the changing historical usage of the phrase “coming out”:

The letters also challenge the common perception that gay men and lesbians spent the 1950s “in the closet.” The word “closet” neither appears in any letters in this book, nor in any ONE correspondence in its current usage. The modern closet metaphor did not exist in the 1950s and early 1960s because there was no expectation that gay people would reveal their homosexuality to anyone except other gay people. “Coming out” to heterosexuals was a political strategy introduced by gay activists in the late 1960s and early 1970s. “The closet” emerged as the binary opposite of this new definition of “coming out”; hence the phrase “coming out of the closet" replaced the older phrase "coming out to gay life." It is misleading when the closet metaphor is applied to the 1950s and 1960s because the term has so many negative connotations. "The closet" is a condescending term associated with being ashamed, frightened, or unhappy about being gay. Most of ONE’s correspondents were none of these things. They did not imagine themselves dwelling in some vast closet, but imagined themselves wearing masks that enabled them to pass as heterosexual when necessary in order to avoid antigay persecution. A "mask" is a very different metaphor than a "closet." Closets are dark places where people hide. Masks imply subterfuge, resistance, defiance, and perhaps most importantly, human agency.

The same author has a companion book to this one called Masked Voices, and those last few lines illuminate the reasoning behind that choice of title.


(via jamochet)


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